How to pack moving boxes-which ones to use

How to pack moving boxes-which ones to use

How To Pack Boxes For Moving

Like everything concerned with your removal preparation is the key

  • Layout a wad of paper on a flat surface, at comfortable working height, from experience packing boxes, is harder on your back than lifting and carrying them.
  • Place the carton to be packed at a comfortable height, on top of a previously wrapped container is a good idea, again protecting your back, so you don’t bend over so far.
  • Select the right carton for the right job( see below)
  • Tip carton upside down to gain ready access to flaps on the bottom of the box.
  • Fold opposite flaps of cartons. DO NOT interlock flaps.
  • Tape bottom of carton securely. We recommend two thickness of packing tape.
  • Line bottom of the carton with padding – scrunched up paper, towels and linen may be used.
  • Wrap all china and glassware pieces separately – then stack in the carton on their ends or ends. When packing always clean your things before putting them in the boxes. There is nothing worse than unpacking dusty ornaments or stale-smelling curtains. Having all the items cleaned up means that your new house is fresh and clean from day one.
  • Breakable items, such as glassware, crockery, etc. should be wrapped individually in butchers’ paper. Glass tumblers should be wrapped one by one, first with a soft paper and then with regular paper. They should be stored and transported upright in a padded box.
  • Ensure that the whole item is wrapped up correctly
  • For Cookery wares, newspapers are usually, enough to protect them from damage. Wrap up your plates with individual papers and line them up on a padded box too. A newspaper is generally sufficient to protect your dishes from damage.
    Wrap up the individual pieces and then put them in a box lined with much more paper. Use tablecloths or towels to line boxes, which will pack with china or glass. You can also use children’s soft toys as a padding material; it helps fill boxes without making them too heavy.
  • After each layer of china or glassware place another layer of padding – ensure there is also sufficient padding on the sides of the carton and finally on the top. Save all your Tupperware and the like to fill the top half of a box, then the container is not too heavy and also there is not too much weight on top of your breakables.
  • When placing layers of items within a carton, always use butchers paper (or equivalent) between each layer.
  • Fill all gaps between items with either butcher’s paper or some form of cushioning; this will decrease movement within the carton. For ease of carriage, pack a mixture of light and heavy items in large cartons.
  • Pack cartons right to the top or fill to the top with padding. BUT DON’T OVERFILL. Keep in mind that the final weight of the box should not exceed average adult-strength (a good weight is around 23kg.)
  • Fold the top flaps of the carton in the same manner as the bottom flaps and tape up securely.
  • Label each carton with name, room and brief description of the goods, to enable easy placement of the carton at delivery. (Remember that felt pen you bought)Stack your packed boxes in a single area.
  • Do not block entrances or access to furniture; this will make your removal day run smoother

If you need to work out how many cartons you may need then read out article here Count the boxes to be moved

removal-carton


Tea Chest or Standard Cartons -Ideal for clothes, light items, linen, crockery, glassware etc. 435 x 410 x 600mm

bookwine-carton

Book or Wine Cartons – Ideal for books, cd’s, breakables, crockery, etc. 410 x 300 x 435mm

Picture Pack

Picture Cartons – Designed for large paintings, pictures, etc. 1040 x 800 x 75mm

port-a-robe

Portarobe – Sturdy large carton designed for ‘hanging’ clothes 600 x 475 x 1100mm

How to pack moving boxes: Choosing the correct type of carton to use

How we would prefer you to pack your boxes, below is a basic description of what boxes or containers should be used for most items

Hanging Wardrobe or Port A Robe

A Port A Robe box can be used for hanging clothes and even shoes.

  • Fold down the flaps on the bottom of the Port A Robe box and tape down using crossing pattern, and one circular tape strip around the vertical edges.
  • Affix metal bar on the top of the box into the slots provided.
  • Use regular hangers to hang the clothes from the metal bar across the top of the box.
  • Place shoes on the floor of the box
  • Close the top flaps and seal the box with tape in the same manner as you tapped the bottom.

Packing clothes from dresser drawers and linen closet

Depending on how many clothes you have and your space availability, use a standard removal carton for these items.

  • Fold down the flaps on the bottom of the linen box and tape down using crossing pattern, and one circular tape strip around the vertical edges.
  • Perhaps line the bottom of the carton with clean paper
  • Fold clothes and place into a box
  • Close the top flaps and seal the box with tape in the same manner as you tapped the bottom.

Packing Small hard items, books, CDs, videotapes, electronics

Use small boxes such as book boxes for these types of things. It is vital that you do not overload these boxes as they will be too heavy for anyone to move if you do.

  • Fold down the flaps on the bottom of the linen box and tape down using crossing pattern, and one circular tape strip around the vertical edges.
  • Perhaps line the bottom of the carton with clean paper
  • Pack books and items into a box
  • Fill the box with clothing from drawers or other loose things.
  • Ensure box is full, maybe by topping off with crushed paper
  • Close the top flaps and seal the box with tape in the same manner as you tapped the bottom.

Packing Pictures and Art Works

Valuable artwork can easily be packed into a small or large picture box depending on the size of the frame using primary packing material such as moving blankets, furniture pads, bubble wrap, and white packing paper.

  • Fold down the flaps on the bottom of the linen box and tape down using crossing pattern, and one circular tape strip around the vertical edges.
  • Place large bubble wrap on the bottom of the box with the bubble side down.
  • Generously wrap white packing paper or moving blankets and furniture pads around the pictures.
  • Stack pictures vertically, on the edges.
  • Fill up spaces between walls and pictures with white packing paper or moving blankets and furniture pads.
  • Close the top flaps and seal the box with tape in the same manner as you taped the bottom.

Packing a priority carton

Pack A Priority Carton

Another great idea is to pack a Priority carton.

Items that you may consider to pack in this carton would be.

  • Leads for TV’s Stereos and computers
  • Nuts and bolts from any items that you or your removalist may have Dis-assembled.
  • Kettle, Coffee, Tea, Sugar, Mugs and Teaspoons. (For you and the removalist at delivery).
  • Small First Aid Kit for any unexpected emergencies. (This should probably contain any regular medication your family needs, just in case.)
  • Any last minute items that are found under furniture etc. as you clean up.

Once completed, ensure that your carton is well marked with Priority and notify the removalist on the day of your move.

Tell him this carton holds the Kettle and coffee, and this will ensure that your carton will be last on and first off when unloading the removal truck

Packing Boxes When Moving Interstate

Start with out-of-season items.

  • Next, pack things used infrequently. Leave until last the things you’ll need until moving day.
  • Empty drawers of breakables, spillable, items not recommended for inclusion in your shipment and anything that would puncture or damage other things. However, blankets, sweaters, lingerie, bath towels and similar soft, lightweight goods are ok to be left in drawers.
  • Pack similar items together. For example, do not pack a delicate china figurine in the same carton with cast-iron frying pans.
  • Keep all parts or pairs of things together. For example, curtain rod hangers, mirror bolts and other small hardware items should be placed in plastic or cloth bags and taped or tied securely to the article to which they belong.
  • Wind electrical cords, fastening them, so they do not dangle.
  • Wrap items individually in clean paper; use tissue paper, paper towels or even facial tissue for fine china, crystal and delicate belongings. Use a double layer of newspaper for a proper outer wrapping.
  • Place a two- or three-inch layer of crushed paper in the bottom of a carton for cushioning.
  • Build up in layers, with heaviest things on the bottom, medium weight next and lightest on top.
  • As each layer is complete, fill in empty spaces firmly with crushed paper. It is also a good idea to add more crushed paper to make a level base for the next layer or use sheets or cardboard cut from cartons as dividers.
  • Cushion well with crushed paper; towels and lightweight blankets also may be used for padding and cushioning. The more fragile the item, the more cushioning needed. Be sure no sharp points, edges or rims are left uncovered.
  • Pack small, fragile, individually wrapped items separately.
  • A few together in small boxes, cushioning with crushed or shredded paper.
  • Place small boxes in a single large carton, filling in spaces with crushed paper.
  • Avoid overloading cartons, but strive for a firm pack that will prevent items from shifting. The cover should close easily without force, but should not bend inward.
  • As you finish with each carton, list the contents on the side of the container (for easy viewing while cartons are stacked) and in a special notebook. You might want to number and/or code the cartons as well.
  • Indicate your name and the room to which each carton is to bound for at the destination on the label.
  • Tape a sign on the door of each room at destination corresponding to the carton labels so movers can get the cartons into the correct rooms quickly.
  • Put a special mark on cartons you want to unpack first at the destination.